meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

(via yattacloud)




syfien:

Bf got me a new T-shirt ~

syfien:

Bf got me a new T-shirt ~

(via ghostinggirl)


*wipes phone screen on breast*


how do draw good

  • fill 14 sketch book
  • bad stuff is good stuff bc you made stuff
  • do you like sparkle???? draw sparkle
  • draw what make your heart do the smiley emote
  • member to drink lotsa agua or else bad time
  • d ont stress friend all is well
  • your art is hot like potato crisps
  • don’t let anyone piss on your good mood amigo
  • if they do
  • eat
  • them

(via fantastical-blogomotron)



believebeluga:

Wingardium leviorca

believebeluga:

Wingardium leviorca

(via anotherfirename)


aaronbeckerillustration:

The tour is over. 2 weeks of school visits, bookstore appearances, library readings, and catching up with both new and old friends. I will admit that I am exhausted. I will also admit that we authors and illustrators tend to be solitary beings and that being out in the world like this might be more exhausting than it might be for your average refrigerator salesman. But in the end, I will also admit this: it is unbelievably amazing to connect to the children that have found my books. There were moments during the tour when I would look out into the crowd, mid-tale, and realize that I have created something of real, substantial value in this world. A total privilege to have the opportunity to a) do this for my job and b) have parents, teachers, book publicists, and book sellers work so hard to get me out in front of these fantastic, captivated audiences. I thought of my own fifth grade self, and how the stories that influenced me back then REALLY influenced me. They set a course for my life. And here I am - potentially making that story for some kid out there. There were kids who knew my books backwards and forwards; kids who had questions about my stories that I had never considered; and kids who were picking up the books for the very first time who I had the honor of sharing in their wonder. It’s actually hard to believe. So thank you all for making this trip so memorable. Hope to see you all again soon! 

aaronbeckerillustration:

The tour is over. 2 weeks of school visits, bookstore appearances, library readings, and catching up with both new and old friends. I will admit that I am exhausted. I will also admit that we authors and illustrators tend to be solitary beings and that being out in the world like this might be more exhausting than it might be for your average refrigerator salesman. But in the end, I will also admit this: it is unbelievably amazing to connect to the children that have found my books. There were moments during the tour when I would look out into the crowd, mid-tale, and realize that I have created something of real, substantial value in this world. A total privilege to have the opportunity to a) do this for my job and b) have parents, teachers, book publicists, and book sellers work so hard to get me out in front of these fantastic, captivated audiences. I thought of my own fifth grade self, and how the stories that influenced me back then REALLY influenced me. They set a course for my life. And here I am - potentially making that story for some kid out there. There were kids who knew my books backwards and forwards; kids who had questions about my stories that I had never considered; and kids who were picking up the books for the very first time who I had the honor of sharing in their wonder. It’s actually hard to believe. So thank you all for making this trip so memorable. Hope to see you all again soon! 


ketrinadrawsalot:

Meet Humphrey, the humpback whale. Not related to the Humphrey who got stuck in San Francisco Bay in the 90s.

ketrinadrawsalot:

Meet Humphrey, the humpback whale. Not related to the Humphrey who got stuck in San Francisco Bay in the 90s.

(via fightingforwhales)


sionic1:

this gets me everytime

sionic1:

this gets me everytime

(via moriarty)


nauticalprincex:

i can’t wait until i can afford my taste in clothes

(via ghostinggirl)


fantastical-blogomotron:

I wanted to do one of those cute “What I wore today!” kind of posts/drawings, but I then realized that I was DOG TIRED. And, also, that I wore grey and yellow, today, which is not entirely interesting.
These might get a little perkier as the week goes on, and as I finish my finals. Or I might forget that I’m doing them partway into the week, which is more likely.
Anywho, here’s Monday!

fantastical-blogomotron:

I wanted to do one of those cute “What I wore today!” kind of posts/drawings, but I then realized that I was DOG TIRED. And, also, that I wore grey and yellow, today, which is not entirely interesting.

These might get a little perkier as the week goes on, and as I finish my finals. Or I might forget that I’m doing them partway into the week, which is more likely.

Anywho, here’s Monday!